Archive for September, 2018

A Glimpse into Social Justice 12 Classrooms Reveals Dynamic Lessons

September 18, 2018

by Janet Nicol

Long-term thinking is not radical. What’s radical is to completely alter the planet’s climate, to betray the future of my generation. What’s radical is to write off the fact that change is within our reach. —Anjali Appandurai

Stacey McEachern introduces a climate justice unit to her students using this and other powerful quotes from environmentalists.   The unit is part of a Social Justice 12 course that McEachern teaches at Eric Hamber Secondary School, one of eleven Vancouver  secondary schools running the course this school year.

Social Justice 12 is a popular elective that has been offered across the province since 2008.

While there is no prescribed text or final exam, this course prepares students for future studies by giving them opportunities to analyze, discuss and participate in a wide variety of social issues.

A glimpse into some of Vancouver’s classrooms shows teachers and students are engaged in many dynamic lessons.

-Article excerpt, Social Justice newsletter, (BC Teachers’ Federation) Summer/Fall 2018, available on line at the BCTF website.

Watercolour, 2018, by Janet Nicol – A red rose became a symbol for social democrats in western Europe in the decades following the Second World War.

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Book reviews on Arthur Pitts, BC artist and the early history of Fernie

September 18, 2018

I review two books — The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts by Kerry Mason and Fernie at War: 1914-1919 by Wayne Norton in the current issue of BC History magazine.

Arthur Pitts (1892-1972) was a watercolorist, illustrator and photographer from England who spent most of his adult life in BC, primarily in the Victoria area and in Vancouver. His depictions of BC landscapes and First Nations people are “a valuable contribution to the artistic documentation of the Northwest Coast First Nations” according to author Kerry Mason, who also brings in Coast Salish artist Carey Newman to weigh in on Pitts’ legacy.

Fernie, in the east Kootenays of BC, continues to attract tourists for its beauty and layered history.  Author Wayne Norton examines the town during the First World War and aftermath, highlighting residents who were both  loyal and critical to the King’s call to arms.  The hard lives of coal miners and their union struggles are also described in detail.

Both books are highly recommended.

Available in BC History, Fall 2018 – Subscription and distribution details at the magazine website.