In the shadow of the lash – the case of William Squire

by Janet Mary Nicol

Vancouver, 1935

William Squire’s first night at Oakalla Prison Farm could not have been an easy one, even though his cellmates included 47 longshoremen, 20 of whom were married with children. The men had been complaining of rats and bad food to visiting family and co-workers.  Overcrowding was another problem, even acknowledged by the warden, Walter Owen.

Squire was assured his legal appeal was a union priority for three reasons: because of the severity of the sentence of three years in prison and five lashes, because the union was convinced of Squire’s innocence and “because his prosecution arose out of his labour activities.”

-excerpt from “In the Shadow the Lash,” to appear in the upcoming issue of BC History magazine, Summer 2016. Cover illustration by David Lester.

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